Room

October. 16,2015
Rating:
8.1
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Trailer Synopsis Cast Keywords

Jack is a young boy of 5 years old who has lived all his life in one room. He believes everything within it are the only real things in the world. But what will happen when his Ma suddenly tells him that there are other things outside of Room?

Brie Larson as  Joy 'Ma' Newsome
Jacob Tremblay as  Jack Newsome
Joan Allen as  Nancy Newsome
Sean Bridgers as  Old Nick
William H. Macy as  Robert Newsome
Tom McCamus as  Leo
Amanda Brugel as  Officer Parker
Joe Pingue as  Officer Grabowski
Cas Anvar as  Dr. Mittal
Wendy Crewson as  Talk Show Host
based on novel
carpet
isolation
kidnapping
imprisonment
grandparents
escape
hospital
dog
captive
mother son relationship
shed
skylight

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Reviews

Reno
2018/02/24

> Discovering a whole new world beyond the 4 walls.We all know the German folk tale 'Rupanzel', and this is a similar kind with entirely different motive. All the above it is not a fairy tale set in the medieval period, but inspired by many real events of the present era. A couple of years ago I saw a German movie called '3096 Days' based on the true story. When I heard of this movie is being made, at first obviously I remembered that title, but after seeing the poster alone convinced me not the same. Automatically the expectations rose, and now it's got the 4 Oscars nominees, including the best motion picture.The both halves of the movie were entirely different from each other like the two sets of story, but the core of the theme remains same. The first half was a crucial part that takes place completely in a single room with a minimal cast. It does not go through the intro, just begins to tell the story like it's already happening and you might take a few minutes to realise the state of condition. The next half is a reaction to what happened in the previous. And again this is also an important storytelling section because like the title, it was not all about the room, but beyond that 4 walls and its roof and floor like how it affected the mother and son.> "If you don't mind, it doesn't matter."The movie does not talk about the crime feature at all. Not even considered to reveal behind the motive. So the other side mystery remains as it is. The whole narration was one sided, everything was seen through the eyes of a five year old boy. He begins with the line 'Once upon a time...' like a fairy tale, because it is to him and with his cute little performance along with Brie Larson's, the movie briefs their struggle for freedom.It was a too casual opening, like nothing bad is really happening, just they're weird people or maybe agoraphobia, except they're not. You know when we say we love to be kids again to escape this complicated adult life, sometimes we won't mean it except it was a normal reaction to the situation we're in. But what if a five year old boy wants to be four again when her mother thinks its time to him know what the real world looks like. Yeah, that's a too much to take in for a young boy, but that's the best chance they had to break free from the psycho who put her mother in that room.> "When I was small, I only knew small things.> But now I'm five, I know everything."It was a tidy place, but the camera angles were impressive. I know it was shot in a studio with a wide open space behind the camera, but that does not the viewpoint in the actual story. When the first half ends, it is an indication of the good parts are over, at least that's what I thought of, but what came after was the unexpected expansion in narration. Usually most of the similar tales end in that part itself like for example 'Prisoners' and the rest is understandable stuff that won't be shown.When a tale had a ending like 'happily ever after', still some people desire for it to continue a few more minutes to know how happy really they are and that's what this film's second half. Remember, most of the similar themes have multiple perspectives, like how victim's family is coping with, cops are pursuing the suspect, abductor's plans and motive, and captives struggle. Like I said it was all about what a mother and her son goes through those years in captivity and after that.There were some suspicious characters and events like I had a bad feeling over the doctor's soft talking, also the mother-son's master plan when in captive. Those are tiny diversions to viewers assume differently against where the story is heading. It is all about the mother and son's mental trauma, especially for the little boy similar to when Tarzan is in a big town for the first time leaving behind his other life. It was a perfect pace as well, neither hurried nor a slow development. The movie was a big break for many, especially for the Irish director, and Brie Larson and of course for the kid. Definitely one of the finest movie of 2015 and a must watch.9/10

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Claudio Carvalho
2017/04/17

Sensitive and Delicate---Joy Newsome (Brie Larson) and her son Jack (Jacob Tremblay) live in a small room in a shed without windows and with only a skylight on the roof. When Joy has encounters with a man, Jack locks himself in a closet. When Jack is five years old, Joy tells him that she lived with her parents in a comfortable house and a man called Old Nick lured and kidnapped her seven years ago. Joy plots a scheme to let Jack flee from the room and call the police. When they are rescued, they move to the house of Joy's mother and they have to begin the adaptation to the routine of a normal life. But is it not easy."Room" is a sensitive and delicate film with a dramatic and realistic story of woman and child abuse and the effects in the aftermath. The screenplay is very well written increasing tension without the use of cheap means such as graphic violence, sex and gore but only subtle dialogues. Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay have awesome performances, showing also fantastic chemistry, and with magnificent supporting cast including names such as Joan Allen and William H. Macy. In the end, "Room" is an unforgettable and unique film that touches the viewer's heart. My vote is eight.Title (Brazil): "O Quarto de Jack" ("The Room of Jack")

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Andres-Camara
2017/01/02

One of those small movies that deserve much more than what will ever be given---This is a movie I saw because it was nominated for the Oscars. I had to see the one to make the bet. Thank God I make the bet, I have come to see this great movie. Although I think that it has several shortcomings of script, that will explain in zone spoiler, still I think that it knows them to surpass more and goes ahead. Also hooks and you want to continue watching.The actors are great. If I'm not mistaken they are all unknown but that does not stop them from being great. Even the child and it is not easy to do.The picture is not very good outdoors, but to make a credible film is enough.Even if you do not have nice blueprints or composites. The director, if he knows how to take the film forward. When the thread is finished, it knows how to change and move on and that is very difficult.Spoiler:For me the problem with the script is that I think that the idea of ??the room ends quickly and then it has to continue somewhere. You are watching it and you do not know what happens until you discover it, but when you discover it, you do not know where it is going to go, but it is still on one side and still very well. At the second turning point, the same thing happens exactly as well.Another great thing about the movie, which plays the script is that of acceptance. Will the grandparents accept their grandchild born of rape? It is a pleasure to meet these jewels that the world of cinema offers us.

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brando647
2016/11/11

ROOM is an Emotional Juggernaut; One of 2015's Top Films---Lenny Abrahamson directed one of the best hidden gems of 2014 in FRANK, a strange little film starring Domhnall Gleeson and Michael Fassbender about an indie band getting an unpleasant taste of mainstream success. It was a dark comedy with some real emotion sown into it. A year later, Abrahamson returns with a new film where he goes straight for the heart with a vengeance in ROOM. This man is one of the best directors I've found for emotional impact, keeping in mind I've seeing nothing else of his work but the two mentioned. But there is no denying the emotional gut punch you get watching ROOM. Based on a source novel from author Emma Donoghue (who also penned the script), it's a disturbing (and eventually uplifting) tale told primarily from the perspective of little Jack (Jacob Tremblay). As the movie begins, Jack is awakening for his fifth birthday in Room, the only world he knows. He was born in Room lived in it all his life with his mom (Brie Larson). He's a relatively happy child who believes Room to encompass the entirety of the world. Except, now that he's five, his mom believes it's time for him to know the truth. Seven years prior, she had been tricked and abducted by the man he knows only as Old Nick, the mysterious visitor who comes at night while Jack's asleep to bring food and supplies. Old Nick locked Jack's mom in the little 11' x 11' garden shed and she's been trapped there ever since. Now that Jack is getting older, his mom wants him to help them escape to freedom.ROOM is divided into two distinct halves: inside Room and outside Room. The first half of the movie is arguably the best material in my opinion. It paints a picture of daily life for Jack and his mom, giving the audience a glimpse into their meager existence. Ma tries to make the best of a bad situation for Jack but there's only so much she can do. Until now, Jack has had zero knowledge of a world beyond the walls. He believes TV shows are from other planets, believes common things like trees and dogs are make-believe, and addresses every item in Room as if it were one of his best friends. While Ma has done her best to keep Jack somewhat normalized and happy, she isn't faring as well. She's been beaten, tortured, and raped. She's been trapped in this room for seven years with only a small skylight in the ceiling giving her a glimpse of the natural sky. There are days when the pressure just gets to be too much; Jack calls them her "gone days" when she lies in bed, not moving or speaking a word. It's a nerve-wracking first half to a film and ramps up to the eventual escape planning. Again, the emotional gut punches keep coming as Ma realizes she will likely have to put her son in mortal danger if she ever hopes of getting him out of there with the chance of a normal life. Meanwhile, Jack is confused and scared out of his wits. His mom has turned his entire world upside down with talk of how there is an enormous world outside the four walls and how all those things he believed imaginary are real.The second half of the movie loses a little steam because we don't have the built-in tension that comes with a captive and her son living in a box with an unstable kidnapper, but it delves into life after Room. It shows how Ma and Jack begin to adjust to the real world. To Jack, of course, this is more than his mind can process at first. I mean, the kid has never seen a horizon before and now he's faced with new environments, new experiences, and new people. While Jack does have his own troubles acclimating to the new life, Ma seems to have it worse. She seems all right at the start, relieved to be free and happy to return to normality, but after seven years of that sort of tortuous existence, normal doesn't come easy. Her parents have since divorced and her own mother has an old friend as her new live-in boyfriend. Her father has moved away and returns to reconnect with his long-lost daughter, but he has trouble accepting Jack and his?well?origins. Brie Larson does a phenomenal job with this material. Ma is a complex, deeply troubled character and Larson positively nails it with a very natural, genuine performance. She deserved every award she brought home for this role. Equal accolades belong to young Jacob Tremblay. In my experiences, the grand majority of child actors turn in stiff, unnatural performances but there are exceptions and Tremblay is top of the list. I believed every moment of his performance in ROOM and it's a real accomplishment for both him and director Abrahamson. ROOM is undoubtedly one of the best movies from 2015 (again, my opinion but I strongly believe so) and it comes with a strong recommendation from me. You'd have to be pretty dead inside for this movie to have not even the slightest emotional effect on you.

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jamesthecat-67828
2016/09/16

Beautiful, moving, intense---I haven't seen a genuinely emotional, smart, non-manipulative, heart- felt drama in a loooong time. Brie Larson deservedly won an Oscar for her performance in this, but Room should've swept the board in every category.The film centres on a Mother and her five year old son, living inside just four walls, and it slowly transpires that she has been held captive for seven years, and had a child by her kidnapper. She creates a world for her son within their confines, not telling him the truth about their situation and what's outside until he's old enough to understand. After failed escape attempts in the past, but now with the help of her son, she gives freedom another try.There were moments in Room that were so intense that I barely breathed. It never feels inauthentic, and thanks to incredible acting, it's always believable. If you want a straight-up thriller of 'bad guy commits crime, bad guy gets comeuppance', you'll be disappointed. This is about human resilience, the bond between Mother and child, selflessness, and finding your place in the world after having your understanding of it flipped upside down.

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b_velkova
2016/03/31

Overly unrealistic and lacking depth---The movie has its moving moments, especially the emblematic one with the kid staring in awe at the newly discovered world, but that's about it. The story is overly unrealistic and both the psychological drama and the physical misery lack depth.17-year-old girl is kidnapped with the lure that some sick dog needs her attention. This is followed by 7 years of imprisonment in a backyard shed (the so-called "Room") and regular raping, which – in the second year – produces a child. The mother accepts the fruit of the relationship (named Jack) without reservations and from that moment on her only goal is to keep it safe. A goal in which she succeeds with flying colors. And so, no matter his complete isolation, the misery of his existence, and the fact that he is a constant, although unconscious, witness of his mother's abuse, at 5 Jack is both mentally and physically healthy, even happy child, he has smooth skin and complex reactions and the only sign of his unusual circumstances is his long hair...I didn't even have to use irony – the whole thing is flat enough on its own. Actually, I see it as an insult to anyone who have lived through "the Room trauma" – be it real, or more metaphoric. It sets ridiculous standards for the victims while what they truly need is understanding and compassion. But yeah, let's say that mother's love conquers it all and clap our hands.

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CineCritic2517
2016/02/22

Boring and nonsensical---A woman and her son are held in a garden shed, referred to as 'room', by a man who uses the woman as his sex slave, having abducted her 7 years earlier. The woman concocts a plan to smuggle the son out in order for him to find help and free them. After the plan is successfully executed, we follow the two in the aftermath of the ordeal, struggling to retrieve the life that was previously stolen from her.The film is repetitive and annoying. At no point is the captivity nor the woman's response to the situation believable. It's just a garden shed located in some suburb instead of underground. The woman's not shackled and can virtually escape every time the captor enters the room. Relying on child actors is a notoriously shaky endeavour and again the constant whining of the kid and the way it talks, is grating and tiresome. There also seems to be no real connect between the first and second act. The 7 years she previously spent in the room might just as well have been a written premise at the start of the film. With no deeper layers to the film and with no character really fleshed out, the film feels aimless and not well thought-through.3/10

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Turfseer
2016/01/29

Disturbing abduction plot and subsequent redemption tale doesn't rise above the level of an average Lifetime Movie---Room is based on the 2010 novel of the same name by the Irish turned Canadian novelist/playwright Emma Donoghue. The film has already garnered accolades from almost all critical quarters with heaps of approbation for its lead actress, Brie Larson. It's a rather uncomplicated story with a plot that is broken up into two distinct parts.For the first 45 minutes or so, a young mother, Joy, and five year old son, Jack, appear trapped in a small room where they've been residing for quite a long time. Eventually it's revealed we're watching a horror story: seven years earlier, when Joy was 17 years old, she was kidnapped by a neighborhood pervert, Old Nick, who has kept her prisoner in a shed next to his house. Old Nick makes what appear to be weekly visits bringing groceries but also rapes Joy whenever he comes over. There's no escape from the room that only has one skylight window since Old Nick is the only one who knows the numbers to the combination lock to enter.Jack is born as a result of Old Nick violating Joy and it's her son that's the only thing keeping her alive. The child does remarkably well despite growing up in such a deprived environment. Joy teaches Jack how to make a birthday cake and he plays with the limited amount of objects found in the room—occasionally Old Nick might bring the boy a present (such as an electric model car). There are of course tensions between mother and son—Joy doesn't react well when Jack throws a tantrum for example.The best part of the picture is the way in which Joy and Jack are rescued from this abominable situation--but unfortunately it's not all that believable. Joy's plan is to have Jack pretend that he's dead and instruct him how to escape from inside a rolled up rug after Old Nick drives away in his pickup to dispose of the "body." The entire escape is predicated on Old Nick's decision not to check to see if Jack is really dead—as the scene plays out, Old Nick inexplicably backs off after Joy screams at him not to look at Jack because (as she explains it to him), she can't stomach the idea of the pervert touching her dead son. The subsequent way in which Jack miraculously escapes from Old Nick's truck and the heart- pounding way in which the police figure out where the little boy came from, make up for the slow-moving turn of events in Act One.The second half of Room does not have the rising tension found in the first. The focus on how all the family members adjust is what the second half of Act Two is all about. Joy returns home to find her mother Nancy divorced from her father Robert, and now married to Leo. There is an underdeveloped subplot involving Robert who is repulsed by the idea that Jack was conceived through rape and that his father was pervert Old Nick. Robert goes home to an out of state residence and his catalog of resentments remain unexplored.A better subplot involves the intrusion of the media upon Joy and the rest of the family. Joy agrees to give an interview to a reporter for money and she asks her painful questions about what went on with Old Nick and whether she made the right decision in raising Jack and depriving him of a normal childhood (the suggestion is made that she could have convinced Old Nick to leave the newborn Jack anonymously at a hospital). Conflict develops between Joy and Nancy and eventually there's the rather predictable trope of Joy attempting suicide. Most critics found Jack's acclimation to his new found world to be touching and cathartic. When he bonds with Leo's dog and a new pal next door, all seems right with the world. And even Joy is seen getting herself together at film's end.So what is one to think of all this? It's a story that I suppose holds one's interest to the end; although the central twist (i.e. the escape), feels contrived. While the young Jacob Tremblay did a fine job playing Jack, his successful adjustment to the outside world feels to me much more schematic than cathartic, as many critics insist. As for Brie Larson, calls for her to win an Oscar for best actress seem misplaced--although her performance is fine given the pedestrian script.In the end, Room rises to the level of an average Lifetime movie, with a few interesting twists and turns here and there but more predictable elements making up the bulk of the overall proceedings.

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bob-the-movie-man
2016/01/27

Awesome film - shame about the trailer---Room, based on the book by Emma Donoghue, starts on young Jack's 5th birthday. He gets a birthday cake from his mother (but no candles); a visit from his father; and a gift, albeit belatedly. This would all be perfectly normal except that all of this takes place within 'Room' - a confined space with only a single skylight for daylight and no means of escape. For the mother, Joy, was abducted as a teen and locked away for sex in the style of the dreadful real-life examples such as that perpetrated by Josef Fritzl in Austria. Jack is the (presumably) unintended result: a boy with no perception of the real world beyond his four single-sided walls and with the staunchly-held view that the things he sees on a flickering TV screen are in 'TV land' and unreal. Will Jack and Joy survive and ever see freedom again? And that's where I'll leave this synopsis, since (if you've been lucky enough to avoid the trailer) there is a tense cat-and-mouse story to unfurl here.This is an absorbing, although slow-moving, film that builds to some truly nail-biting moments. The screenwriter (also Donoghue) and director (Irishman Lenny "Frank" Abrahamson) are to be commended in keeping the story and drama really well-grounded and un-saccharined. Old Nick (Sean Bridgers), the 'evil kidnapper', is not painted as some predictable monster: he is even portrayed to be kind and caring at some warped level. And there is no gratuitous sex: we are in effect seven years into the story and the abnormal is now completely normalised.The film is told primarily from the viewpoint of Jack (Jacob Tremblay) but we also get under the skin of Joy (Brie Larson) and her emotions in trying to mentally deal with her ordeal. Looking at a picture of her with her school friends she bitterly comments that "Nothing happened to them - - they just got on with their lives".The acting is superb. I made the mistake of voting for John Boyega for the BAFTA Rising Star award before seeing this film (you can cast your vote here http://www.bafta.org/film/awards/ee-rising-star-award-in-2016). Not that Boyega isn't great, but Brie Larson really REALLY delivers here. She obviously won't give a hoot if she wins the Best Actress Oscar! And for me, for this award, she shines out in what I would perhaps see as one of this year's weaker Oscar categories. Jacob Tremblay is also exceptional as Jack - and it would be nice (rather than try to compare young performances with adult ones, as per Anna Paquin) if there was a special awards category for actors and actresses under 10. If there was, then Tremblay would storm it! You seriously forget that this is a child acting a part. He is totally connected to the role and these two core performances lock in your belief in the story.Supporting the cast are the ever reliable William H Macy as Joy's mentally tortured father, Joan Allen (Pamela Landy from the "Bourne" films) as her equally distraught mother and Sean Bridgers as the kidnapper.At 2 hours long some of the scenes in the middle of the film made my attention waver a little. But my main criticism is in the trailer and marketing of the film. If ever there was a need for a true 'teaser trailer' this is it. I never know who is responsible for putting trailers together - whether the director has the final say or whether its some nameless marketing bods in the distribution company, but whoever it is they should be taken out and 'given a good talking to' for this travesty. It's like putting all of the twists in films like "The Crying Game", "The Sixth Sense" and "Gone Girl" in their respective trailers. I've gone so far as to create my own One Mann's Movies cut of the trailer, just for you good people, which I have included with my bob-the-movie-man.com version of this review.A leisurely, nuanced and effecting drama, this is not for fans of "Die Hard" or "Fast and Furious" fans. But for everyone else, this should be a must see.Please visit bob-the-movie-man.com for the graphical version of this review. Thanks.

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svorva
2016/01/26

And the Award for Best Drama for Housewives Goes to??---It's hard to get revenge on a bad movie. I am partially consoled considering I snuck into this theater rather than paying for a ticket. Still, this subversion robbed me of the cathartic argument over my refund with some hapless manager. Room stole two hours of my life, and the only way I am going to get value from that experience is to get the last word. Room has an extremely fertile premise. An unnamed woman (Brie Larson) has been kidnapped and imprisoned in a shed for seven years, five of which she has spent raising her son Jack (Jacob Tremblay). I am unaware how the book navigated this premise, but author and screenwriter Emma Donoghue had a bottomless potential of directions and selected none. The writing is too shallow to be a thought experiment on trauma or a character study. The narrative is too muddled by loose ends to be a simple "feel good" movie. Cult classic The Room had a similar degree of cohesion? yeah okay no it didn't. Poor contractually obligated jokes aside, Room is simply aimless. This child grows up in a 10x10 room surrounded by sexual abuse his entire life and his lone complications are a paleness, shyness, and poor grammar. I have met children with comparable behavior from normal households. Children might be plastic, but no one is going to manage a full swift recovery from being born into this environment. The mother character is better explored, but barely. The strength of this woman while kidnapped is unbelievable, but interesting questions are raised after the escape. Her relationship with her parents, her friends, and dealing with new realties are all introduced and either dropped or solved off screen. This is a device derived from the book where everything is seen through Jack's perspective. But post-escape Jack is just cute and boring, not worth following. His narration of events is insufferable. The conclusion of Room is sickening. The film has the audacity to propose that mother and son will be able to leave this experience behind in the closing moments. This claim is beyond ignorant and well into insulting.For the sake of critical fairness I will mention all the two and a half things I enjoyed. The escape sequence is genuinely thrilling. Putting a child in peril is often a cheap way to manipulate the audience. It worked here, so credit is due. Second, the cinematography in the room itself was surprising. I think most films would have tried for a more claustrophobic. Instead, the dimensions are simply defined and unjudged. The abrupt camera pans while Jack is running from wall to wall brilliantly reflects the mindset of these trapped characters. This place is simultaneously small and their entire world; traversing the room is trivial, but also the greatest possible distance. The one victory achieved by the closing scene is the brief moment perfect perspective when the room is seen from the outside. Finally, the acting was serviceable. It is hard to completely differentiate the awful roles from performances, but the film did dodge some melodrama. The Oscars successfully suckered me into watching Room. I would like to just chuck this movie atop a pile of other examples where the illustrious academy failed, but I am apparently in the minority. There are some aspects of quality filmmaking here, but there is no prize for best drama for housewives. Room took a premise ripe with potential and failed to nurture it with a drop of ingenuity or realism. I was disappointed, and I refuse to believe I am the only one.

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